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Maurice Edelman describes his youthful ideal of creating a more just society that prompted him to go into British politics, his eventual disillusionment and cynicism, and the reawakening of his ideal through a visit to the site of Struthof, a former Nazi concentration camp.

Lost Theaters of Somerville: Nick Riselli Interview

Hector Bolitho describes how he came to value solitude and leisure over the fear of being alone and the desire to be in constant competition with others. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Alfred Noyes describes his belief that the complexity of the world can only be attributed to God, and that the clearest revelation of God can be found by looking at the human soul. Contains a short advertisement for This I Believe book (this essay included in the book).

John Rothenstein, the director of the Tate Gallery in London, describes the path that led him to the Roman Catholic Churchas an adolescent and why he continues to be part of the Church.

Herbert Hodge describes his search for his own personal, practical philosophy for life: to try his best at all he does.

Lucile Watson recounts her childhood discovery of the knowledge that she could change herself for the better, and, after successes with simple things such as maintaining her hair and quitting nail-biting, she developed a philosophy for life, including a belief that God was in everything and made everything.

Sir Evelyn Wrench describes how an encounter with extreme poverty shook his faith in God, and how an experience at the funeral service of King Edward VII restored that faith, as he became more inclusive in his beliefs and practices.

Christmas Humphreys recounts his search for beliefs that he could live by, and states his beliefs in the Four Noble Truths of Buddhism.

Lord Oaksey emphasizes the importance of keeping one's values strong but simple so that they may remain solid, and also to be conscious of right and wrong, and also to be aware of opportunity or "luck," then concludes with a poem by Adam Lindsey Gordon.