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Albert Guerard describes his beliefs as a blend of old and new ideals that espouse liberty, progress, tolerance, and charity.

Maurice Edelman describes his youthful ideal of creating a more just society that prompted him to go into British politics, his eventual disillusionment and cynicism, and the reawakening of his ideal through a visit to the site of Struthof, a former Nazi concentration camp.

Julien Bryan describes his early religious beliefs and the transformation, as a result of his experiences in WWI and filmaking, that led him to his belief in the common goodness of all people around the world.

Daryl Zanuck explains that the virtues he learned in his boyhood in Nebraska, charity and loyalty, are still the fundamental virtues that are most important in his life.

Lost Theaters of Somerville: Nick Riselli Interview

Edward R. Murrow introduces This I Believe to the audience and describes its purpose.

Nora Laing describes the process of how she came to believe in the immortality of the soul and in a life's purpose that extended beyond fulfilling physical needs and desires.

Hector Bolitho describes how he came to value solitude and leisure over the fear of being alone and the desire to be in constant competition with others. Audio also contains advertisement for "This I Believe" book.

Alfred Noyes describes his belief that the complexity of the world can only be attributed to God, and that the clearest revelation of God can be found by looking at the human soul. Contains a short advertisement for This I Believe book (this essay included in the book).

Edith Evans describes how she believes that good is stronger than evil, that following Christ's command to love God and one's neighbors will bring about a better world, and that fear of war and social chaos can be answered by relying on the power of good to overcome.

John Rothenstein, the director of the Tate Gallery in London, describes the path that led him to the Roman Catholic Churchas an adolescent and why he continues to be part of the Church.

Clement Reicher recounts a short allegory he wrote as a child which formed the basis for his belief that love must be personal (not idea-driven) and unpossessive, in order to increase and lead ultimately to happiness.

Herbert Hodge describes his search for his own personal, practical philosophy for life: to try his best at all he does.

Uday Shankar describes his belief that his own career path was a result of God's all-powerful will, and that his talents (and those of others) are God's creative force manifest through him.

Clarence Pickett describes his experience in the Korean War during negotiations and how a meditation center highlighted the common humanity in all sides, and all people.

Lord Kemsley describes his beliefs in the importance of family life, home-made entertainment, and self-reliance.

Lucile Watson recounts her childhood discovery of the knowledge that she could change herself for the better, and, after successes with simple things such as maintaining her hair and quitting nail-biting, she developed a philosophy for life, including a belief that God was in everything and made everything.

Alice Holloway, founder of Ideas Unlimited, desribes the influence her grandmother and father have had on her beliefs and her certainty that kindness and service to others in need is the kindness that comes from a deeply spiritual and selfless place in people.

Sir Gerald Barry, Director General of the Festival of Britain, talks about the changes in the world after World War II, his relationship to christianity and his belief that there is no life after death and so one must appreciate and live one's own life to the fullest extent.

Constance Spry describes how she adopted her father's love of truth, justice, beauty, and poetry, and explains her father's practice of listening to, rather than judging, the beliefs and opinions of others.

Mary Agnes Hamilton describes her belief in the soul and the bond it creates between fellow human beings, and her belief in absolute values that remain true despite the evils of Nazism and Communism.

Joshua Lea describes his beliefs (based on the book of Ecclesiastes) that an afterlife would be a surprise but not an unpleasant one; that humanity is not inherantly sinful, but only its inventions; that liberty is essential to allow individuals to live by their own decisions; and that it is his responsibility to exercise his intellect, curiosity, and reason.

Sir Evelyn Wrench describes how an encounter with extreme poverty shook his faith in God, and how an experience at the funeral service of King Edward VII restored that faith, as he became more inclusive in his beliefs and practices.

Christmas Humphreys recounts his search for beliefs that he could live by, and states his beliefs in the Four Noble Truths of Buddhism.

Lord Oaksey emphasizes the importance of keeping one's values strong but simple so that they may remain solid, and also to be conscious of right and wrong, and also to be aware of opportunity or "luck," then concludes with a poem by Adam Lindsey Gordon.

Robert Stacy-Judd relates an experience from early in his career when unemployment left him homeless and in despair; however, rather than taking his own life, he had the opportunity to prevent another from committing suicide, establishing his faith in divine help, prayer, and a sense of humor.

Peter Ustinov describes his belief that organized religion is oppressive, and that doubt, liberalism, the individual, moral courage, and the privacy of the human conscience are all essential to avoid religious oppression.

Lord Beveridge states his belief in "vicarious immortality" and in the value both in leaving a legacy of virtue and in following the legacy left by Christ the man.

William Dalrymple lecture entitled "Return of a King: Shah Shuja and the First Anglo-Afghan War 1839-42"

Julius Bixler explores the tension between faith and reason and explains why skepticism falls short in comparrison to faith and experiences like love, friendship, family and the goodness of people.

Lord Casson describes his appreciation and preference for the simple pleasures he derives from life, art and family, and expresses his relative disinterest in religion and politics.

Sunil Amrith lecture entitled "Islam in the Bay of Bengal: Between Tamil and Malay Worlds"

Robert Travers, Assoc. Professor, Department of History, Cornell University. Lecture entitled "The Connected World of Haji Mustapha: an informer to the British in eighteenth century Bengal"

Partha Chatterjee lecture entitled "Early Modern Absolutism in 18th Century India"

Interviewed in Shantiniketan, West Bengal by Kris Manjapra

Interviewed in Dhaka, Bangladesh by Iftekhar Iqbal

Interviewed in Dhaka, Bangladesh by Iftekhar Iqbal

Interviewed in Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America by Kris Manjapra

Interviewed in Kolkata, West Bengal, India by Kris Manjapra

Interviewed in Oxford, United Kingdom by Kris Manjapra

Dr. Tim Harper, Centre for History and Economics, Magdalene College, Cambridge University. Lecture entitled "Singapore 1915 and the Birth of the Asian Underground"

Interviewed in Kolkata, West Bengal, India by Kris Manjapra

Interviewed in Kolkata, West Bengal, India by Kris Manjapra

Interviewed in Kolkata, West Bengal, India by Kris Manjapra

Interviewed in Kolkata, West Bengal, India by Kris Manjapra

Interviewed in Kolkata, West Bengal, India by Kris Manjapra

Sana Aiyar lecture entitled "Trade and Politics in a Diasporic Milieu: Colonial Kenya's South Asians"

Eric Tagliacozzo lecture entitled Hajj in the Time of Cholera: Pilgrim Ships and Contagion from Southeast Asia to the Red Sea

Interviewed in Kolkata, West Bengal, India by Kris Manjapra