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Charles Abrams tells of his faith in man despite his frequent uncertainty when confronted with the realities of war, greed and other instances of human weakness. However, he remains devoted to the ability of man to rely on his conscience to someday improve and perfect the world in which we live.

Newbold Morris describes the American spirit and howthat spirit is exemplified though progressive, democratic values and their corresponding government programs.

Genevieve B. Earle remembers the surprise of seeing poverty as a child and how she developed a belief in the benefits of a strong government to promote laws and provide for its citizens although she says that can only happen when the people are engaged as active, equal partners in the work of a city.

Roger Ansell, associate editor of Holiday Magazine, describes his belief in the need for skepticism rather than arrogant certainty, in his hope that civilization will advance through the current anxious age, in the importance of seeing society's maturation as a point yet to come in the future, in the realization of the humanity of others, and in the refreshing openness of children.

Lou Crandall uses the analogy of construction to describe his belief that young people are foundations upon which a strong, straight character must be built, and looks to Biblical characters for examples of steadfast integrity.

Lee Bristol describes his belief in the individual, the individual's role in achieving peace and acquiring happiness through humor, service to others, and faith.

Charles Duveen, Jr. describes his experience of being shot from a plane while flying over the Pacific durinig WWII, and how his perspective on life changed from one which placed value in material objects to one which found value in service to others.

Dimitri Mitropolous describes two experiences, that led him to his belief that talent and celebrity should be used to help others.

J. George Frederick uses the analogy of the heart's cardiovascular system to describe his beliefs in the need to love, to forgive, and to sacrifice for others.

W. David Curtiss describes how his well-laid life plans were interrupted by WWII, and how the uncertainty of war taught him to accept change, not with resignation, but with a spirit of adventure.

Bentz Plagemann describes his experience in the Navy during WWII and the resulting belief that with patience and faith there are no difficulties one cannot overcome in life.

Howard Spalding describes his belief in a divine spark that exists within every person and which spurs creative invention and moral reasoning, and states his belief that happiness is achieved through the ability to use creative intelligence in the service of others.

Senator Lehman describes his two basic beliefs: First, one should give back to society according to what he or she has received, and secondly, one should extend respect to the opinions and beliefs of others.

Alexander Bloch describes his parents' desire for him to start a career in business rather than in music, and his ultimate decision to pursue what he loved.

Joe Williams describes how sports and an escape from a plane crash have shaped his beliefs that sports reveal and develop character, and that there comes a point when events in life can no longer be changed, but rather pass "into the record" and must be accepted with calmness.

Mr. and Mrs. Hale, having been married for a long time, talk of the imminent death that will separate them as they age, and inspite of the expected grief they will continue to see life with excitement and wonder, and remind all of the importance to have compassion for everyone.

Verona Slater describes her experience with religion as a child, the daughter of a minister, and how her beliefs in wisdom, kindess, courage and strneght have been shaped by these experiences.

Richard Salmon ponders the magnitude of the universe and describes his realization that everything is part of God's plan and how fishing teaches him to make the best of life.